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What is an Audiogram?

An audiogram is a graph that delineates a meticulous description of an individual’s hearing ability. It is essentially a visual representation of a person’s sense of hearing.

What is an Audiogram all about?

A special graph that is used by audiologists, an audiogram shows the outcome of a pure tone hearing test. In the aftermath of a hearing test, audiologists are able to discern the type, degree and configuration of a patient’s hearing loss.

It portrays the softest sounds a person is able to hear at varying pitches or frequencies. The closer the marks are to the top of the graph, the softer the sound an individual is capable of hearing. The patient’s degree of hearing loss is determined by where their results fall on the audiogram.

What Information does it contain?

The details displayed on an audiogram show the level of intensity of an individual’s hearing ability corresponding to each frequency that is presented during a hearing examination. For example, one axis of the graph shows how well a person is able to hear a sound that is low pitched, such as a bass drum. The other side of the audiogram displays to what extent they are able to hear a high pitched sound, like a bird screeching.

Furthermore, vertical lines on the graph exhibit a pitch i.e. frequency in Hertz (Hz). At the start of the audiogram are the lowest pitches on the left side and as the graph moves forward, the highest pitches are on the right side. In a typical test, audiologists use 125 Hz, 250 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, 4000 Hz and 8000 Hz respectively.

On the other hand, horizontal lines on the graph convey just how loud the sound should be in order for the individual to hear it. The loudness is measured in decibels (dB) on the graph.

Additionally, lines that are found at the top of the chart show  low decibels (soft sounds). This means that the lines at the bottom represent higher decibels, which corresponds to loud sounds. Audiograms generally employ a red O for the right ear of patients and a blue X to mark their left ear.

Why Get an Audiogram?

People should get their hearing checked every couple of years. Their test will naturally produce an audiogram.

An audiogram is useful since it can be used to gauge if the patient is suffering from one of many issues that can adversely affect their ear. For instance, hearing loss may be caused by reasons such as birth defects, which is why newborns and young children often undergo the test.

It may also be owing to chronic ear infections, inherited conditions like otosclerosis, inner ear diseases namely Meniere’s disease, regular exposure to loud noises or a rupture eardrum. An audiogram can be a precursor to the identification of all the aforementioned concerns.

An audiogram is a graph that delineates a meticulous description of an individual’s hearing ability. It is essentially a visual representation of a person’s sense of hearing.

What is an Audiogram all about?

A special graph that is used by audiologists, an audiogram shows the outcome of a pure tone hearing test. In the aftermath of a hearing test, audiologists are able to discern the type, degree and configuration of a patient’s hearing loss.

It portrays the softest sounds a person is able to hear at varying pitches or frequencies. The closer the marks are to the top of the graph, the softer the sound an individual is capable of hearing. The patient’s degree of hearing loss is determined by where their results fall on the audiogram.

What Information does it contain?

The details displayed on an audiogram show the level of intensity of an individual’s hearing ability corresponding to each frequency that is presented during a hearing examination. For example, one axis of the graph shows how well a person is able to hear a sound that is low pitched, such as a bass drum. The other side of the audiogram displays to what extent they are able to hear a high pitched sound, like a bird screeching.

Furthermore, vertical lines on the graph exhibit a pitch i.e. frequency in Hertz (Hz). At the start of the audiogram are the lowest pitches on the left side and as the graph moves forward, the highest pitches are on the right side. In a typical test, audiologists use 125 Hz, 250 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, 4000 Hz and 8000 Hz respectively.

On the other hand, horizontal lines on the graph convey just how loud the sound should be in order for the individual to hear it. The loudness is measured in decibels (dB) on the graph.

Additionally, lines that are found at the top of the chart show  low decibels (soft sounds). This means that the lines at the bottom represent higher decibels, which corresponds to loud sounds. Audiograms generally employ a red O for the right ear of patients and a blue X to mark their left ear.

Why Get an Audiogram?

People should get their hearing checked every couple of years. Their test will naturally produce an audiogram.

An audiogram is useful since it can be used to gauge if the patient is suffering from one of many issues that can adversely affect their ear. For instance, hearing loss may be caused by reasons such as birth defects, which is why newborns and young children often undergo the test.

It may also be owing to chronic ear infections, inherited conditions like otosclerosis, inner ear diseases namely Meniere’s disease, regular exposure to loud noises or a rupture eardrum. An audiogram can be a precursor to the identification of all the aforementioned concerns.